NextSeq, HiSeq or MiSeq for Low Diversity Sequencing ?

Low diversity libraries, such as those from amplicons and those generated by restriction digest can suffer from Illumina focusing issues, a problem not found with random fragment libraries (genomic DNA). Illumina’s real time analysis software uses images from the first 4 cycles to determine cluster positions (X,Y coordinates for each cluster on a tile). With low diversity samples, color intensity is not evenly distributed causing a phasing problem. This tends to result in a high phasing number that deteriorates quickly.

Traditionally this problem is solved in two ways:

1)      ‘Spiking in’ a higher diversity sample such as PhiX (small viral genome used to enable quick alignment and estimation of error rates) into your library.  This increases the diversity at the beginning of your read and takes care of intensity distribution across all four channels. Many groups spike in as much as 50% PhiX in order to achieve a more diverse sample. This disadvantage of this is that you lose 50% of your reads to sample you were never interested in sequencing.

2)      Other groups have designed amplicon primers with a series of random ‘N’ (25%A, 25%T, 25%G, 25%C) bases upstream of their gene target. This and a combination of PhiX spike also helps to increase color diversity. The disadvantage is that these extra bases cut into your desired read length and can be problematic when you are trying to conserve cycles to sequence a 16S variable domain.

Last year, Illumina released a new version of their control program that included updated MiSeq Real Time Analysis (RTA) software that significantly improves the data quality of low diverse samples. This included 1) improved template generation and higher sensitivity template detection of optically dense and dark images,  2) a new color matrix calculation that is performed at the beginning of read 1, 3) using 11 cycles to increase diversity, and 4) new optimizations to phasing and pre-phasing corrections to each cycle and tile to maximize intensity data. Now with a software update and as little as 5% PhiX spike-in, you can sequence low diversity libraries and expect significantly better MiSeq data quality.

Other instruments, including the HiSeq and GAIIx still require at least 20-50% PhiX and are less suited for low diversity samples. If you must use a HiSeq for your amplicon libraries take the following steps with low diversity libraries:

1)      Reduce your cluster density by 50-80% to reduce overlapping clusters

2)      Use a high amount of PhiX spike in (up to 50%) of the total library

3)      Use custom primers with a random sequence to increase diversity. Alternatively, intentionally concatamerize your amplicons and fragment them to increase base diversity at the start of your reads.

The NextSeq 500, released in March of 2014, uses a two channel SBS sequencing process, likely making it even less suited for low diversity amplicons. As of 4/2014, Illumina has not performed significant validation or testing using low diversity samples on the NextSeq 500. It is not expected the NextSeq 500 instrument will perform better than the HiSeq for these sample types.

So, in conclusion, the MiSeq is currently still the best Illumina instrument for sequencing samples of low diversity: https://genohub.com/shop-by-next-gen-sequencing-technology/#query=c814746ad739c57b9a69e449d179c27c

100 Gb of Data per Day – Nextseq 500 Sequencing Services Now Available on Genohub

Nextseq 500, Genohub

Find Nextseq 500 service providers on Genohub.com

Access to the Nextseq 500, Illumina’s first high throughput desktop sequencing instrument, is now available on Genohub.com. While not the highest throughput instrument on the market, it is one of the fastest with up to a 6x increase in bases read per hour (compared to HiSeq). The instrument is ideally suited for those who need a moderate amount of sequencing data (more than a MiSeq run, less than HiSeq) in a short amount of time. We expect the highest interest to be centered around targeted sequencing (exome or custom regions) and fast RNA profiling. For exome studies, you can run between 1-12 samples in a single run and get back 4 Gb at 2 x75 or 5 Gb at a 2×100 read length. If you’re interested in RNA profiling at 10M reads per sample, you can multiplex between 12-36 samples together in a single run. A 1×75 cycle run takes as few as 11 hours to complete and 2×150 runs take ~29 hours.

You can order Nextseq 500 sequencing services today and expect to receive data back in 3-4 days ! Prices for 1 lane start at $2,250. Start your search here and use our helpful filters to narrow down your choices:  https://genohub.com/shop-by-next-gen-sequencing-technology/#query=e4c84df6f5ddd963cc48c30d3f93d505

After you’ve identified the service you need, communicate your questions directly to the service provider. We’ll make sure you get a fast response. Genohub also takes care of billing and invoicing, making domestic & international ordering a breeze. We also have an easy to use project management interface to keep communication and sample specification data in one place.

If you’re not familiar with Nextseq technology or how best this instrument can be applied to your samples, take advantage of our complementary consultation service: https://genohub.com/ngs-consultation/. We can help with your sequencing project design and make recommendation as to what sequencing service would be best suited for your experiment.

Last month we announced the availability of HiSeq X Ten services on Genohub: https://blog.genohub.com/the-1k-30x-whole-human-genome-is-now-available-for-1400/

As an efficient online market for NGS services, Genohub increases your access to the latest instrumentation and technology.  You don’t have to shell out $250K or $10M for a NextSeq or HiSeq X Ten, when access to professional services is right at your fingertips !

 

 

 

The “$1K”, 30X Whole Human Genome is now available for $1,400

HiSeq X Ten Sequencing Services now Available on Genohub

You can now order whole human genome sequencing (~30x coverage) on Genohub.com for $1,400 / sample ($1,550 with library prep). The Kinghorn Centre for Clinical Genomics is accepting orders for their HiSeq X Ten service through Genohub.com.  In fact, you can order this service today: https://genohub.com/shop-by-next-gen-sequencing-technology/#query=5a4399a2a2cab432b240d2426c708472

Designed for population scale human genome sequencing, the HiSeq X Ten when operating individually can output between 1.6-1.8 Tb on a dual flow cell in less than 3 days (600 Gb / day). When running 10 in parallel, tens of thousands of genomes can be sequenced in a single year. While currently Illumina has limited the HiSeq X Ten to human samples, we expect this will change in 2015. 

A single lane of HiSeq X Ten, gives you 750M paired end 2x 150 reads, for a total output of 112.5 Gb / lane. Kinghorn guarantees 100 Gb raw data per lane, with >75% of bases above Q30 at 2x150bp. With a haploid human genome size of 3.2 Gb, that’s equivalent to 30-35x  per lane of sequencing.  The $10 million price tag for the HiSeq X Ten means that not all institutes have access to such sequencing power. Genohub solves this problem by making it easy for researchers interested in next generation sequencing services to access all the latest sequencing technology. We also:

  1. Ensure your project with the provider goes smoothly
  2. Take care of billing and invoicing, making domestic & international ordering a breeze
  3. Have an easy to use project management interface to keep communication and information in one place
  4. Offer NGS project design and consultation
  5. Have competitive pricing and turnaround times

Start your population study on Genohub.com today !

 

 

 

Press Release: Genohub Launches Next Generation Sequencing Marketplace

You can view the original press release on our official launch at PRWeb.com. Thanks to the folks at RNA-Seq Blog for quickly picking up the story.

Genohub announced the launch of their online market for next generation sequencing services today.

Austin, TX (PRWEB) August 16, 2013

Genohub.com announced the launch of their online market for next generation sequencing services today. The online service, is positioned to completely change the way high throughput sequencing services are ordered, accelerating genomic research by improving access to sequencing services. Genohub’s intelligent sequencing matching engine instantly matches researchers with service providers based on specific project criteria. Genohub facilitates the management of sequencing projects throughout the sequencing lifecycle from selecting orderable sequencing packages, to communication, payments and delivery of data.

For Researchers

Genohub’s online service transforms the way researchers go about ordering next generation sequencing (NGS) and reinforces the critical researcher-provider communication cycle involved in every project. Genohub’s model eliminates the need for researchers to call multiple service providers to compare service details and prices. Researchers use the smart NGS matching engine to gain immediate access to up-to-date service listings from reputable providers. The transparent pricing model, with exact service prices, reduces the time needed to compare services and makes it significantly faster, more informed and more accurate than manually ordering by email or phone. Researchers using the service are also able to take advantage of one-time deals and other offers not normally available through a provider’s website or pricing sheet. Clear maximum turnaround times for each service reduces the unpredictability associated with project completion dates. Researchers using the service are able to track the status of their orders, upload data or project specific information and post messages to providers performing the work.

Genohub’s shopping interface is designed to accommodate both researchers with prior experience with the latest sequencing technology, as well as the increasing number of life science researchers who are not necessarily familiar with the latest sequencer specs or perhaps have no prior sequencing experience at all. Experienced users can search by selecting specific instruments and run types while researchers new to sequencing can shop for services by their project requirements, e.g., read number and coverage. Researchers who need help selecting the right sequencing service can also take advantage of free consultation by Genohub’s PhD trained staff.

For Service Providers

Genohub has also invested significantly on promoting NGS service providers by allowing them to advertise services and extend their reach to places where they would normally not receive orders. Providers sign up and list their services in a structured format allowing Genohub’s matching engine to automatically offer services to customers based on their experimental needs. The online service facilitates customer communication via a centralized messaging interface, which allows providers to request data, convey unforeseen handling or quality issues and relay project status to the researcher.

Genohub also automatically generates accurate quotes based on the pricing information that has to be entered by the provider only once. This significantly reduces the amount of time providers would normally have to spend on creating and communicating quotes

“While high-throughput sequencing holds enormous potential for unlocking new discoveries, the high cost and complexity of sequencing projects necessitate a professional marketplace like Genohub to improve access and facilitate collaboration between researchers and service providers across universities, companies, as well as other private and public research organizations around the globe,” said Pouya Razavi, Genohub’s CEO and co-founder.

Media Contact:
Estevan McCalley, Head of Customer Development
Genohub
512-436-0111
info@genohub.com
https://genohub.com/